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XXIX. Entry of Judgment

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EXHIBIT B: Possible Land Divestments

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF INYO* * * *

CITY OF LOS ANGELES; DEPARTMENT CASE NO. 12908 STIPULATION AND ORDER FOR JUDGMENT

DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND POWER OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES, Plaintiffs,

Defendants.

__________________________________________

It is hereby ordered by this Court, and stipulated by and between Plaintiff, CITY OF LOS ANGELES (Los Angeles) and DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND POWER OF THE CITY OF LOS ANGELES (Department) by and through JAMES K. HAHN, City Attorney; EDWARD C. FARRELL, Chief Assistant City Attorney for Water and Power; by EDWARD A. SCHLOTMAN, Assistant City Attorney; and defendants COUNTY OF INYO (County) by and through PAUL N. BRUCE, County Counsel; GREGORY L. JAMES, Special Counsel; and ANTONIO ROSSMANN, Special Counsel; as follows:

In 1913, the City of Los Angeles completed an aqueduct from Owens Valley to the City. The aqueduct had a capacity of 480 cubic feet per second (cfs). In 1970, a second aqueduct with a capacity of 300 cfs was completed and began operating, bringing the total capacity of the aqueduct system to about 780 cfs. Los Angeles’ operations to supply the second aqueduct, including the pumping of groundwater in Owens Valley led to litigation by Inyo County against Los Angeles.

In a suit filed in 1972, Inyo County claimed that increased groundwater pumping was harming the environment of Owens Valley and that the practice should be analyzed in an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) in accordance with the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). In 1973, the Court of Appeal for the Third Appellate District ruled that Los Angeles must prepare an EIR (32 Cal. App. 3d 795). Since 1973, Los Angeles has prepared two EIR’s, one in 1976 and another in 1979, but the Appellate Court found both to be legally inadequate.

In 1980, the Inyo County Board of Supervisors drafted, and the Inyo County voters passed, a groundwater ordinance to regulate groundwater pumping in the Valley through a groundwater management plan. The plan was to be implemented by a groundwater pumping permit procedure. The ordinance created a County Water Department and a County Water Commission.

As a result of litigation commenced against the County by the City of Los Angeles and its Department, the County was directed in May 1981, by order of this Court in case number 12883, not to implement the Ordinance until a legally sufficient environmental impact report had been prepared and adopted by the County. A Final EIR was prepared, but the Final EIR was not adopted by the County.

In July 1983, as a result of litigation commenced by the City of Los Angeles and the Department, this Court in case number 12908 ruled said Ordinance unconstitutional, invalid, and preempted by law, and that the implementation of the Ordinance should be enjoined. Pursuant to stipulation of the parties, entry of an injunction and final judgment have not been entered by this Court.

When I click on “Recipes”, Flipboard displays food-related content it has pulled for me and I can easily swipe up (or flip!) until I find something I like.

Towards the bottom of each flippable story, there are three icons. The allows you to favorite content, the + lets you add the story to your own magazine (more on this later), and the brings up a dropdown list with the options to share the piece, view it on web, save the image, or show less similar content. It is a handy menu that shows Flipboard’s dedication to mastering personalization for each user.

At the top of the page, a downward arrow next to “Recipes” shows magazines compiled by other users when clicked. From here, I can follow magazines I like, as well as users whose interests align with my own.

For a new user coming in without any knowledge of Flipboard or its features (me!), swiping up for individual articles did not come intuitively. Keeping less tech-savvy users and new users in mind, Flipboard could incorporate a short tutorial covering key features and functionalities right into the onboarding process. Another option is sending dynamic in-app messages or push notifications to educate new users throughout their first-time experience.

During flipping, I also noticed off-topic advertising embedded into my stories. At one point, I was pushed shoes alongside an article about stomach-soothing infused waters in my “Recipes” magazine.

While monetizing an app is difficult, and free apps have to take what they can get at times, I can’t help but feel that Flipboard could have pulled more relevant ads. In my case, food product or appliance advertisements would have made much more sense.

Flipboard users can manually create their own magazines and fill them with content they love. The process is simple. Visit a “smart magazine” from your home feed and begin flipping. Once you come across a story you want to save for later, click on the + sign on the bottom right corner of the page, or on the symbol at the top right corner of the page.

After flipping through some recipes, I find a post from Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle blog, Goop , that seems intriguing. I tap the + sign, name my magazine “International Foods,” and add my first story.

To access any magazines I create now and in the future, I can click the profile icon on the app homepage. From here, all my magazines are organized on a visual tile grid.

Similar to my feedback above for flipping, it is not immediately obvious to new users that they can create their own magazines. To call attention to this key functionality, Flipboard could include it in a short tutorial (as discussed earlier), or with dynamic in-app messages throughout the first time user experience. It is worth testing to see if any changes in user engagement occur.

Another strategy is leveraging cross-channel messaging as part of a comprehensive lifecycle campaign. After users have familiarized themselves with adding passions and flipping through stories, Flipboard could reach out via push notifications or email and introduce more features. For example, the day after a user first downloads and tinkers with the app, a friendly push notification (“Now that you’ve mastered the basics, let’s create your own magazine!) may just bring them back. Similar messages can be distributed on other channels throughout the customer lifecycle to continuously re-engage users.